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Is it possible to do postgraduation in nanotechnology after an undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering?

I read in wikipedia that "At the smallest scales, mechanical engineering becomes nanotechnology…". So, can I study Mechanical Engineering and then go in for nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is my main interest. If there are other undergraduate courses after which I can do postgraduation in nanotechnology, please let me know. Thanks a lot!

I’d suggest contacting a research company in a nanotechnology field to ask what they are looking for. Someone in the HR department should be able to help you. You never know – by being proactive at an early stage you may get some work experience or a scholarship.

Nanotechnology usually involves processes that stem from silicon technology so electronics may be a closer fit.

The control system, software, power source and manufacturing technique are likely to be covered by an electronics degree but thermodynamics (I think they have a nano-steam engine), kinematics, structure, stress/strain, material science, gears etc. will be the domain of mechanical engineering.

You may want to consider mechatronics or systems engineering which are a cross between mechanical and electrical/electronic engineering. But, studying a pure, main stream, subject (like mechanical or electronic engineering) will make it easier to find work.

When enrolling talk to the careers adviser at your college or chosen university. It’s up to you to choose the course that best suits your needs and expectations. Don’t assume – ask the course leader if you will get the grounding needed for your chosen vocation.

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  1. energeticthinker says:

    I believe that you need to get a ‘graduate’ degree before you can do postgraduate work.

    Check out the Materials Engineering programs at colleges/universities that you might be interested in attending graduate school at.

    Check out the research activities of the Materials Engineering professors. (This should be listed on the department’s website). Find one (or more) professors in that department that seem to be working on nanotech. Contact them to find out more about your chances of doing such research as a grad (or postgrad) student/researcher.

    Good luck.
    References :

  2. Mike says:

    I’d suggest contacting a research company in a nanotechnology field to ask what they are looking for. Someone in the HR department should be able to help you. You never know – by being proactive at an early stage you may get some work experience or a scholarship.

    Nanotechnology usually involves processes that stem from silicon technology so electronics may be a closer fit.

    The control system, software, power source and manufacturing technique are likely to be covered by an electronics degree but thermodynamics (I think they have a nano-steam engine), kinematics, structure, stress/strain, material science, gears etc. will be the domain of mechanical engineering.

    You may want to consider mechatronics or systems engineering which are a cross between mechanical and electrical/electronic engineering. But, studying a pure, main stream, subject (like mechanical or electronic engineering) will make it easier to find work.

    When enrolling talk to the careers adviser at your college or chosen university. It’s up to you to choose the course that best suits your needs and expectations. Don’t assume – ask the course leader if you will get the grounding needed for your chosen vocation.
    References :

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